Finding New Members For Your Club


Introduction
New members are important to the success of every Toastmasters club. New members mean better meeting programs, new ideas, a larger pool of potential leaders, more fun, and more funds for the club. But a host of activities and responsibilities compete for people's time and attention. Priorities and interests change often and members leave the club. Without enough members, clubs can't provide the positive, enjoyable, supportive environment that is the hallmark of the Toastmasters learning program.

Recruit New Members
Every member is responsible for contributing to the success of the club and to the success of fellow members. Ensuring the club has enough members to properly conduct club meetings is part of that responsibility. Some things members can do to help attract new members:

  • Talk to friends, relatives, and co-workers
  • Wear a Toastmasters membership pin every day
  • Display the Toastmaster magazine
  • Distribute promotional brochures and fliers
  • Conduct a Speechcraft workshop
  • Create an account on a social networking site, such as meetup.com or facebook.com.

Treat Guests Properly
When an individual does visit a club, the treatment they receive from current members during their visit is a strong factor in the decision whether to join the club or not. At every meeting,
all members should make every effort to:

  • Greet guests at the door as they arrive
  • Sit with a guest during the meeting
  • Speak with the guest after the meeting
  • Invite the guest to join members for any after-meeting socializing
  • Ask the guest to visit again

Conclusion
Toastmasters is a very personal organization in that people are brought into the club on a personal basis. A club's membership will grow only as each member becomes personally involved. One enthusiastic person can bring more members into a club than all the tools ever devised by a membership committee. Always keep the club's membership efforts personal, helpful, and friendly.

A guest never forgets the host who had treated him kindly. – Homer